Posted on Leave a comment

A Dermatologist’s journal during the COVID-19 pandemic: week 4

April 6 – 12, 2020

The way we look at the world really depends on our own rose-colored glasses.

MFC

They say that its takes 21 days before you develop a habit. Maybe it is true.

I’ve started to embrace the new normal in our lives. Although there is a skeleton of a routine, I have shifted my gears to find joy in the little bits of achievement I make everyday. That one paragraph of the project proposal, that 1 webinar every 3 days (?), that 10 minute exercise which I manage to do all in between enjoying my time with these two funny monkeys.

It has lessened the pressure I put on myself to tick off so many things in my daily to-do-list… and has made me much happier.

Posted on Leave a comment

A Dermatologist’s journal during the COVID-19 pandemic: week 3

March 30 – April 5, 2020

The third week of the enhanced community quarantine has been a challenge. I’ve always had an optimistic outlook in life… so even with the quarantine, I didn’t really panic about anything.

This week was different. I lost 2 loved ones to COVID-19, 2 days apart. It was unexpected… and their loss hit me hard. From a scientific perspective, I know the weight of this disease. From a personal standpoint, now I can really feel the burden of this pandemic.

My elder child created this artwork for everyone fighting this disease. We’re in this together, we can do this, let’s not give up!

Posted on Leave a comment

A Dermatologist’s journal during the COVID-19 pandemic: week 2

Week 2: March 23-29, 2020

Amidst home schooling, clinical work & household chores, here I am trying to keep my sanity the best way I know how -- masking! LOL!

Amidst home schooling, clinical work & household chores, here I am trying to keep my sanity the best way I know how — masking! LOL!

Dr. Mabelle Colayco

  • This is the magnetic face mask that is part of the Gold Facial. Hydrates the skin and leaves a dewy glow.

If there is one word that can sum up this week, it’s HOME SCHOOL!

I am a quiet and private person. Not many people outside of my family know that I am a recently separated solo parent of two young children. The enhanced community quarantine had me close my private and hospital clinics. Although it has given me this much-needed time to be with my children, it has also impacted my financial capacity considerably. I alone support my small family plus our staff. As I continue to do my clinical work behind the scenes, I have also started to feel the strain of home schooling.

Initially, we started with just morning sit-down sessions and afternoon physical or creative activity sessions. However, the homework load has increased this week. I have my elder child work on his assignments almost the whole day everyday… And it’s not just him working on it. I have to read, understand and teach the lessons. Don’t get me wrong. I love my children, and there’s nothing I wouldn’t do for them… But I miss regular school!

Tutoring + working + household chores = one exhausted stay-at-home dermatologist!

Posted on Leave a comment

A Dermatologist’s journal during the COVID-19 pandemic: week 1

Week 1: March 16-22, 2020

It has exactly been one week since the Philippine government enforced the community quarantine in Metro Manila. (Officially, the Luzon-wide enhanced community quarantine was enforced on March 17.) The past 7 days have been unreal. Many afternoons I wake up from my nap thinking if this is really happening or not. Back in my clinic, working from 9am to 6pm, 5 days a week, I remember wishing to take power naps during the afternoon… And now, I am actually doing it. The problem is that all routines have gone out the window, and the air is full of uncertainty.

I am not a COVID-19 expert, but what I do know is that social distancing can help contain the spread of the virus. So I closed all of my clinics since the implementation of the quarantine. However, yesterday, I received a call that I need to see an admitted patient in the hospital. I felt like I was going to on a hospital duty for the first time again. I must admit that I was and still am, as I write this, scared. This thing that I cannot see may follow me home. Although it may not affect me, I can be a carrier to my family… and that is what I am most afraid of. 

Posted on Leave a comment

Saved by a dermatoscope – the tale of lichen aureus

A male in his late 20s with a 2-year history of an asymptomatic coppery-rust-colored patch on one if his shins. It doesn’t itch, doesn’t blister, isn’t painful, but the lesion bothers him because he doesn’t know what it is.

Honestly, I thought it was nummular eczema at first glance, but on dermoscopy: (orange arrow) coppery-reddish-orange background with (brown arrow) brown network and (red arrow) red punctate vessels at the periphery. Whew!
I thought it was cool to diagnose this with a dermatoscope and ease my patient’s anxiety. 😊